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with our immigration system. that technology world sees that people have gotten their phd from schools like mit. if you are a farmer, you would say that the migrant farmers do not have their papers. if you are checking crowdabs in maryland, the season be destroyed because you do not have workers. below thing is a mess. i have hope that -- the whole thing is a mess. >> you represent a lot of companies in silicon valley. what are you hearing from them? what is the solution to these problems? >> at it not so much a h-1 visa problem. i'm not saying it should be repealed, but it has structural problems. the real answer is residents. if you have some hot shot that got his phd in computer science from stanford, he's getting offers from all over the world. if you make them stay in limbo for six years, that's not really competitive. we want people to stay here and create jobs. that does not just in the tech field, but throughout the economy. make it easy for people to stay and grow american jobs to help our economy recover. >> what is the atmosphere for potential immigration reform in congress? >> w
the international consumer electronics show in las vegas with a discussion on government's role many technology. then president obama awards this year's recipients of the national medals for science, technology and innovation. and after that we're live as policymakers, health care industry leaders and representatives of government gather for a national health policy conference. >> congress returns today to capitol hill. the house comes in at 2 p.m. eastern to take up a small number of bills under suspension of the rules with votes at 6:30. also this week a debate and vote on a measure to require the president to submit a balanced budget to congress. over in the senate, members also come back at 2 eastern for general speeches. then at about 5:30, a vote on the bill to reauthorize the violence against women act, a domestic violence law that expired in 2011. a final vote on that could happen later this week. members of both parties are attending retreat this week. as a result, the senate will be out on tuesday and wednesday, and the house no legislative business on thursday or friday. live coverag
of the technology sector. certainly start of companies can be from the person that decides it wants to open a dry cleaners to the latest in technology that originates and we see here at this trade show. where the greatest success seem to be was in the innovation arena, that technology arena, and it appeared to me that government was about to make a decision that was going to limit the opportunity that innovation would have for the economy. and did not expect to have much success, the allies, they were on the other side of the issue. significant players, both in congress and outside. if he was in the room, i would give him full credit for the success. the reality as it was the community the decided they were going to participate in making their position known and felt in washington, d.c. as a result, what was unexpected became the outcome, the unexpected outcome of stopping sopa and pipa was the success we had as a result of citizen participation. i hope that at victory is felt that democracy is still alive and well. a person's. of you can be heard and make a difference. that outcome was the expec
and everybody sees it from the situation they are in so the technology world that people that got their ph.d. in to start a company here but that doesn't any sense. for the farmer you see that your migrant farmworkers don't have their papers and you are going to have to file under and if you are chucking crabs in maryland you see that the season is going to be destroyed because you don't have workers so the whole thing is a mess and i have hopes that we will have a reform effort that is really top to bottom and bipartisan. >> host: representative lofgren you represent a lot of high-tech companies in silicon valley. what you hear from them and what do you see as the solutions to these problems? >> guest: it's not so much in h-1b problem. i'm not suggesting the h-1b program should be repealed. it does need reform. does have structural problems that can lead to underpaying immigrants to the detriment of the american co-worker but the real answer is permanent residents. we are competing on a worldwide stage and if you have got some hotshot that just got his ph.d. in computer science from stanf
, from health care, from these markets that we're just scratching the surface in terms of technology applications. >> host: will panasonic still be manufacturing televisions? >> guest: i don't know. >> host: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cu
care reform. last but not least the use of technology. we have the ability to share information with technology that we have today with their computers and the internet, have databases where we can share information with doctors and hospitals and they can keep the costs down and make sure that the consumer has good information and thorough information so that they can make the choice. it gives power to the consumer which i think we all appreciate and frankly at the end of the day i trust the consumer to make the decisions that are in the best interest for them. we have too much of a government mentality. we know best. we need to choose for you. you may make the wrong decision and i think that is wrongheaded. so let me conclude this part by saying what i'm talking about with utah here is a way of addressing this reform. it may not be the way. other states have different demographics. we have a young population in utah. we are the youngest in america. i am the oldest guy in utah. [laughter] if you compared our demographics with safe florida which has a lot more seniors compound th
, especially women trying to consider a career in science and technology, if you get to the undergraduate level that dr. jackson's heart about, if you see nothing but four years of math and science classes before you can apply to something that makes it come to life, uses a lot of people during that time. we look at bioengineering to where you can see the impact and it really brings the potential career and impact the lives unless the secret to grow and turn that trend around. >> it's federal government to implement to strengthen their nations and maximize taxpayer dollars? are your witness to that? >> i pay attention more to results. right now if i look results coming out in s.t.e.m. education, we continue to be ranked so i'm most global ranks in the work we have is the nation is still in front of us on that. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> gentleman from massachusetts, mr. kennedy is recognized. >> thank you for calling this hearing. witnesses, thank you for your testimony. as a resident of its should be aware of the are indeed in appreciate your time coming here today. president templeton, th
. >> the science, space and technology committee will come to order. i'll recognize myself for an opening statement and the ranking member for her opening statement. the topic of today's hearing, the first of this committee and this congress, is american competitiveness. the role of research and development. this is an appropriate hearing because much of the jurisdiction of this committee relates to keeping america globally competitive. america's ability to compete depends on whether we have the present vision to conduct the science that will define the future. as the wall behind me says, where there is no vision, the people perish. this committee's goal and today's hearing is to help define that vision and ensure that america continues to be the leader of global innovation. our first hearing today will will begin this process by examining the positive impact of today's r&d and looking forward to potential breakthrough innovations in the future. americans have always been innovators and explorers. our ancestors crossed oceans, opened fronttears and ventured to explore a new content and even travel
companies of our time, a behemoth built on the best technology that could be invented required tedious today the business that this brilliant industrialist acquired agreed to pay $2.1 billion in cold hard cash for acne packet, a company that enables voice to be carried over the internet among other skill sets and has been down on its financial looked like acme dynamite. is considered top notch. ellison is taking advantage of the pullback time talking about. oracle is paying $29.25 a share. the stock is down from $83 less than a year ago. it's only down because it had a couple short falls that won't matter at all when it is part of a sweeter product that gives oracle a hardware and software solution. frankly it is brilliant, so brilliant the markets say it could be higher because at me pack it was trading above the price. ellison is a buyer. how about this michael down fila? he's a huge debt buyer. his just announced leveraged buyout to purchase the company for more than 35% above where the stock stood up that long ago. the price tag is down from $50 a year ago and $25 five years ago. michael
dell strikes a $24 billion deal to go private. what the buyout means for investors and the technology industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is
out how we advanced to the next stage, how we build out these clean technologies and diverse technologies that will allow us to do your choices. more and do it in a clean and environmentally responsible way. raising our energy costs, imposing the mandates, other heavy handed ideas but are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, they will not pass. we have tried it once. so, what we need to be doing as we move forward, rulemaking efforts, as we know, which will try to take things in a direction that i would disagree with. we need to find ways to develop those technologies that allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. so, we need to develop the resources that we have today. we do it domestically, cut our dependence, taking a portion of that revenue and specifically dedicating it in it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about our energy funds and how they would build out and truly help us advance. that is kind of the framework. it is good reading. it is thoughtful reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on critically important t
his own technology research firm, g.v.a. research. >> susie: so, david, the big question of the day, today was what can michael dell do with his dell computer company as a private company he couldn't do as a public company? what's different, really? >> out of the public eye, dell can go through some fairly wrenching shifts in terms of the mix of business the company has, and be able to do so without necessarily having to essentially hold the hand of public sector equity investors. from that standpoint, we can look at a fairly strong deemphasis of the customer p.c. business. the company will most likely stay with the enterprise. but what the company does in terms of trying to pursue or stay relevant to this shift over to tablet p.c.s and smartphones remains a very open question. >> susie: these are uncertain times for any p.c.-maker. it is isn't a dell-only problem. you wonder can michael dell really fix things up at dell? >> certainly he has done well enough in the past. but investors have been scratching their heads in the last five years, wondering what is the next great idea mich
a bright spot for the u.s. economy. thanks to new fracking technology, surging domestic production cut crude oil imports last year by 227 million barrels. but that success was offset somewhat by imports of manufactured goods. >> the flip side of the coin is that our imports of non-oil goods are still going up. they're going up pretty rapidly. and that is of great concern to me as an economist. those are the things that compete with our own manufactured products. >> reporter: china remains a major competitor for u.s. companies. our trade deficit with china hit a record $315 billion last year. separately, china reported it's exports grew 25% over a year ago, easily beating expectations. the robust growth was attributed to aggressive new lending by chinese banks. >> just a few months ago, the chinese economy was in contraction. we've seen really two or three months where we are seeing much stronger growth in china and that's increasing the demand for goods there. >> reporter: but analysts say the news from china may have been somewhat distorted by statistical quirks and the start of the c
principle is innovation and technology. when i say italy everybody will think of the arts and music. they don't think of technology yet we want to persuade you there are lots of things to be discovered. i was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your support and it's not just top down but bottom up. we're are open to your ideas and suggestions. we want
of technology in the southern part of the district. home of microsoft and a lot of biomedical device companies and rich agricultural industry of dairies and specialty crops. emigration is important from many different aspects. you talked -- we talked about h1b minute talk about a starter visa program. would you talk about how that would work in conjunction with the program? >> the starter visa would do wonderful -- wonders for seattle and new york and more for silicon valley. there are tens of thousands of companies that would be started almost overnight if we gave the entrepreneurs the ability to do that. it can start a company but you cannot work for a period that is brain dead. we would have a boom in entrepreneurship but we have not seen before. it should be done independently of everything else we're doing. just get that done so we can fix the immediate problem. there is the issue of hab's. -- h1b's. there are debates about whether they take jobs away. and in other parts you do need h1b's. the more urgent thing is to give green cards to the millions who are already here. let them start th
but solid technology companies with good cash flow trying as much as $15 billion. i can't think of a better affirmation what that could be worth and what an in-your-face sign that the personal-computer portion of technology has a few innings left in the game. how about companies that already have a problem? what do we do with those? are they being bought? are these valuations stretched as the younger analysts have repeatedly told us? take virgin media, a company when i was looking at the charts, that's a gigantic european cable company. stock trading $21 a little less than a year ago, closed at $38 and change yesterday. isn't that too much of a run? >> isn't that a stock worth selling? knot if you are john malone, the dean of the cable industry. in this company, entertainment, a man so renowned for his deal savvy that my colleague on squawk on the street this morning called him the smartest man he ever met, which after i had taken a minute's worth of on bridge about i found myself in courage. malone is not even walking away from the game. he's paying mid-40s. under 50 but mid-40s for possib
reference in there, diesel technology. diesel is make a comeback. you get 30% more mileage. for example, this car can go around $600 mile per fill-up. so it makes a great road trip car. and diesel vehicles are typically, you have more power than their gasoline variants. but nowadays, they are much cleaner than they used to be and in fact, california where they have the strictest emission laws, just certified clean diesel vehicles. >> and talk about some of the technology on the inside of that car. >> one of the thins that will be highlighted is just user friendly technology interfaces and telematics. audi has what they call mmi which comingles their navigation and all their interfaces. it has wi-fi and you can connect a cadre of different devices. that is good for the kids. my daughter is studying for a spelling bea and my daughter can be on her ipad online. >> this is a nice porsche. >> this is a cayan suv. this represents over 50% of their sales. this is coming there a manufacturer that previously only made sports cars. but they have many variants of this car. butt diesel version, the
figures out how we advanced to that next stage, how we build out these technologies, clean technologies and diverse technologies that allow us to do more and do it in no way that is an environmentally responsible way. imposing the mandates of other heavy hand of ideas that are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. they are not going to pass congress. what we need to be dealing, as we move forward, there will be rolled-making efforts. -- rule-making efforts. need to find those ways that we develop the technologies to really allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. we need to develop resources that we have today, do it domestically so we cut our dependence on opec. take a portion of that revenue and we specifically dedicate it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about the energy deployment fund and how it will build out and advance. that is the framework. it is good reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on a critically important topic. . do see a lot of new changes happening to the new administration. how could we summarize those chang
of smart phones and technology led to a surge in the way young people me up. sometimes to have sex. there is a danger that has proven deadly. >> it was my baby. my baby. >> melinda lee is grieving the loss of her granddaughter. head andhot in the stop indie at a bus northwest d.c.. they told police that her on a called tagged.te one of hundreds of hook-up or sites.g notley told police he did sext her but wanted to have with her. to meet him for the of theime the night twenty fourth. >> she probably realized she made a mistake. >> there are other reports of teens' engaging through these sites. kids were raped after meeting men they connected with skout. skout and tagged and a number these experiences are andoting meeting people strangers. very bad things can happen. >> they say enough is enough, parents should start taking precautions with their cellphone provider. >> get a monitor on and go the opportunity to block applications. an application actually can provide an inroad past your l controls. there,can put your head you have the situation that i have right now. >> you can find m
with mexico and with all our technology and everything we do, we still have -- could you imagine now you are trying to control them all at the same time that is going to be a difficult thing to do. >> let me invite the panelists to address it and i eluted to this in my brief introduction on one excuse or part of all the extra constitutional measures the fact that they didn't occur in a vacuum. all of a rush of thinking and platitude profound problems, soldiers not being paid that are working with the radicals that paid better and more regularly. there was the question of involvement in but individuals it's well known in interpol and other law enforcement those that were involved as business partners with the people was illicit extremists because they are working together and everyone is happy together. >> before you fallen to a saturation of the insurgency their political legitimacy, the counterinsurgency without political legitimacy so how did you get the sequencing and how you get back to that of the discussion that i think with the emphasis on raising funds and military operation trai
. >>> eyes in the sky. unmanned drones, wartime technology roaming the skies here at home. who are they watching, and why? >>> the struggle. new jersey governor chris christie is in the middle of a fight erupting in public over his own weight. tonight what a former white house doctor said about him and how he fired back. >>> and one year from tonight, if you can believe it, opening ceremonies at the winter olympics. tonight we'll show you the resort town packed with palm trees where they hope to have snow on the slopes a year from now. "nightly news" begins now. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening. for the folks who have moved to an all-electronic web-based life, today's news maybe wasn't all that impactful. but for the folks with mailboxes in cities and towns across this countron dirt roads or in apartment buildings, there's always been mail on saturday. six days a week, since the time of abraham lincoln. but today the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturda
and what he thinks of the company he started in today's technology in this trade. coming up. >>> later, the business of broadway. how the big bets are the real showstoppers on the great white way and beyond. way and beyond. stay with us. >>> well, the world's second richest man bill gates has a mission to change the world one glar at a time. the billionaire philanthropist released his annual letter this week describing the work his foundation is doing to address challenges in global health and education across the globe. i spoke to the man who made microsoft at the world economic forum in davos last week. in the road aweighedhead for the company he founded and his success successor, steve bammer. >> tech leaders, those are hard jobs. amazing things. be great. >> microsoft has not had an easy time recently. would you ever return to the front office? >> i'm engaged adds chairman on a part-time basis but my full-time work for the rest of my life will be the foundation work. microsoft has a lot of exciting things going on. it's a competitive field. windows 8 has done well. surface computer
, receptionists, not things where your skills get stale because of advances in technology there are plenty of all unemployed workers that work and technology fields or feel for the technology continues to develop. sometimes they spend that time keeping up with their skills. most people who are computer professionals are people love to be on the computer and love to learn the new thing. even if they are not working and i have spoken to many workers, they are learning new programs out there and learning new technology on their own because that's just what they do. the way i would read a book for pleasure, they will get on a computer and learn something new because that's what they enjoy doing. there is this assumption among some employers that skills are getting stale but there is no looking at the resume for speaking to a qualified individual if that is true. host: the federal level made an effort on this action as well. this was the federal fair employment opportunity act of 2011. it would make it illegal for employers to discriminate against the unemployed, job applicants could sue and recover d
claim north korea used bann enn missile technology. >>> right now, vice president joe biden is meeting with leaders in germany. earlier this morning, he talked about iran's nuclear ambitions at a security conference in munich. he says there's still room for diplomacy if iran is willing to make a good faith effort. >>> today marks one year since the murder of a transgender woman in northeast d.c. mayor vincent gray will be among those attending a vigil today at the bus stop where she was murdered. jones was waiting for a bus at the intersecti-- when she was s the face. she later died from her injuries. >>> a maryland community is coming together to help a family who lost two of their daughters in a massive house fire. the fire broke out late thursday night on highland avenue in frederick county. 3-year-old sophie and 6-year-old madigan died of smoke inhalation. four members of the family survived. neighbors describe the chaos as they saw the house go up in flames. >> she wasn't screaming like words. it was just like a painful scream. >> absolutely devastated. a mother's worst nightmare.
casualties, but relative to any other technology we have short of sending in, you know, an assassin with a sniper rifle which in many cases just isn't practical, drones are the best way to sort of take the enemy off the battlefield. they don't cost a lot of money. there's no risk to u.s. forces and it's more or less invisible. you don't see pictures of the, by and large, huge craters because they leave pretty small imprints. it's just a couple hellfire missiles pretty often. pretty irresistible. what we have not had so much debate about is what are the consequences in those countries where people see the effects of the drones, their relatives are being killed. are we potentially creating more terrorists over the long run than we're killing. that's the burning policy question in washington. i think there hasn't been enough debate about it. >> the other question it raised in your article is the obama administration asked the faa to speed up processing of integrated drones into civilian air space. they could be used by police departments, farmers, builders, hollywood, but with this pro
that we have to get used to? >> it is, because we have the technology now to do things we haven't done before. but the argument that congress ought to be involved in supervising this is an important one, and we should not ignore it. the congress has a responsibility, not just the authority, but the responsibility to supervise the activities of the executive branch, and in particular, the intelligence committee which takes a look at all the black programs and is kept in the loop on everything certainly has the capability of making an evaluation of what is the right thing to do and is the wrong thing to do, and needs to weigh in. to the extent it doesn't do that, then it's abrogated its responsibilities. >> sam, what is your take on what the hearings are going to be like tomorrow for mr. brennan. this should be questions right out of the chute, shouldn't it? >> yes. this is a major component of the president's war on terror. it's a major component of his foreign policy. and listen, there is a difference between operational oversight, which is what congressman rogers was stressing in the
technology, family friendly. we have all the details about the auto show when fox 5 morning news continues after the break. wh ole ain, multigrain cheerios! my bowl, my spoons! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios has whole grain and 110 delicious calories. ...more grains. less you! multigrain cheerios in multi-grain cheerios peanut butter. progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. >>> time to answer today's super bowl trivia question. we asked which of these teams, you'll see them, which of these teams we showed you earlier are undefeated in the super bowl? >> remember,, they've been in the super bowl, because some haven't been in the super bowl. out of these teams do you have an answer? you know
and border patrol and technology. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: congress returns today, part of the agenda includes consideration of a bill requiring the white house to produce a balanced budget. the story today from "the washington times" airlines readers that the budget act requires the president to put out a budget by the first monday of february. senator harry reid said the gun legislation in the senate will include magazine size and background checks, but it would not seek a ban on military-style assault weapons. an amendment could be included to cover that. the president heads to minneapolis to discuss gun control. and the cost of the 2012 elections are in. the final price tag is estimated at $7 billion. according to the consumer confidence index, half the respondents said that the financial crisis went under the labour retirement plan. we are interested in hearing from you if the financial crisis delay your retirement. want to give us a call, the numbers are on your screen. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. if y
that change and increasing the tempo is the role that technology played. i mean, obviously, we've seen the development of drones, we've seen the application of supercomputers. of one of the things that you did was move intelligence analysts out into balad, into your base there integrating everything up front. can you talk about that a little bit, the role that technology played? >> yeah. there are several things of technology that changed the fight. one is obvious, it was of predators. it wasn't drone strikes, it was drone surveillance. because you put a surveillance that give cans you full motion video means that anywhere on our force to include the guys on the ground could watch what the predator's watching in full-time video or realtime video. the real effect of that is several. one is where it used to take let's say 120 people to raid a target when only 20 were going inside, it takes 100 to secure it outside to make sure you don't get people reinforcing, what not. if you can do it from the air, you only send 20. now, the other hundred can hit five other targets. so we could hit six
like taking risk in this environment. apple is the technology company and i can understand apple's view that they have freedom of cash on the balance sheet. some of this is complicated. some of the cash is overseas, they bring it home, thee incur some tax liability. cash on your balance sheet is freedom. it's freedom from bankers. >> we're going to slip in a quick break. bob, you're going to be with us for the rest of the hour. and i'm going to send it back to pebble beach and the one and only becky quick. >> when we come back, we're talking about putting money to work behind the next big thing. since we're here on the west coast, we figured we had to technology technology. we're going to talk to an investor in siri intelligent and ask him if he thinks aapple has a cash problem. plus, a live report on the weather in the northeast as they phase for blizzard conditions. i'm glad we got cdw and cisco to design our data center. yeah, the cisco ucsc series server, with the intel xeon processors, help us scale smoothly, like a perfect golf swing. how was it before? clunky and full of unnecess
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must mainta
play a limited role in the future. the present generation of nuclear technology is way too expeive. if you run a utility and you decide to build a new nuclear power plant, you go to your engineers or you go to any engineering consulting firm in the world and ask,okay, how much will this cost. they will say to you we really have no idea. >> right. >> then ask you them how long will it take to build it. and they'll say we don't know. >> and those are serious problems if you are trying to build a power plant. and that's really why the industry has declined. to state the issues, even after fushima, can-- it can be managed. >> rose: so it's the cost, not the safety. >> it's the cost and it's the nature of the, of the cost accounting. they're only in a thousand to 1200 megawatts, that means that they used to cause 4 or 500 million, now it's 5, 6, 8 billion dollars. if takes a long time. you don't want to build increments that are that big that take that long. particularly in an age like the '70s after the oil shocks where you don't know what conservation and efficiency and renewables wil
in the end. >> also have chipotle mexican coming out with, in a moment and zynga as well, technology. do you like tech here? >> yeah, although i think what's happening, you're seeing a shift to more risk large cap to small cap, growth to value. i think that's the trend. >> all right. thank you both. good to see you. as you can see executives from the brand name, makers of the baking soda arm a.m. hammer ringing the closing bell. stay tuned for disney earnings. >>> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? hi, everybody of welcome back to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of the new york stock exchange. this market rallying back after monday's selloff but the dow jones industrial average unable to close above the 14,000 mark. a rally on the street of 98 point, set lipping at 13,978. up three-quarters of 1%. nasdaq higher, up 1.25%, technology, one of the leadership groups on the upside. 3171 and the s&p 500 up 15 points, better than 1% to 1511. three straight triple-digit moves for the dow strilz, up, down and up today. we bring in ed batowski along wi
can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. shareable data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. >>> good to have you back with us tonight. the fallout continues over department of justice memo obtained by nbc news. the memo outlines the obama administration's justification for the targeted killing of american citizens overseas by drone strikes if those citizens are considered to be high-level al qaeda operatives plotting against the united states. progressives want answers. tonight an administration official tells nbc news that president obama has directed the justice department to provide congressional intelligence committees access to classified information providing the legal rationale for these drone strikes. this comes after the white house faced a second day of questioning on the subject. spokesman jay carney says president obama is not troub
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